Book Review: Solitary by Travis Thrasher

About the Book

His Loneliness Will Soon Turn to Fear…. When Chris Buckley moves to Solitary, North Carolina, he faces the reality of his parents’ divorce, a school full of nameless faces—and Jocelyn Evans. Jocelyn is beautiful and mysterious enough to leave Chris speechless. But the more Jocelyn resists him, the more the two are drawn together. Chris soon learns that Jocelyn has secrets as deep as the town itself. Secrets more terrifying than the bullies he faces in the locker room or his mother’s unexplained nightmares. He slowly begins to understand the horrific answers. The question is whether he can save Jocelyn in time. This first book in the Solitary Tales series will take you from the cold halls of high school to the dark rooms of an abandoned cabin—and remind you what it means to believe in what you cannot see.

Solitary Tales #1

Solitary

Genre: Young Adult, Christian Fiction, Fiction, Mystery, Christian, Thriller, Horror, Suspense, Romance, Teen

Book Review

Solitary is one mysterious book that never gets better. Just when you think you’re about to get to the root of the matter, something happens that leaves you clueless and speechless.

If you’re looking for a merge of mystery, suspense, horror, romantic, and teen fiction, Solitary is the book for you.

Solitary is about a 16-year-old teenager called Chris Buckley whose parent’s divorce caused him and his mother to move to his mother’s childhood home, Solitary.

A mysterious small town with mysterious people and crazy happenings.

Chris sees and falls in love with Jocelyn, a mysterious girl who has been marked by some unknown evil people.

Chris tries to get closer to her but gets several warnings from faceless people, well meaning friends, and Jocelyn herself.

But he wouldn’t budge.

The more they tried to get him away, the more curious he got.

Together with Jocelyn, they tried to find answers…

There was the stubborn Chris’ mother who just won’t leave Solitary even with all the nightmares and all the bad vibes she was getting. 

Sometimes it got really annoying. 

And there was Poe and Rachel, Jocelyn’s friends who were just two different people and yet so closed off. They didn’t seem like Jocelyn’s friends or like people who really cared about her (like Chris did anyway) towards the end of the book.

Then there was the evil perv, Wade, who was the worst character in the book. I liked what eventually happened to him.

There was also Gus and the old creepy staunch house; I wished there were more stories about the house.

I feel the author gave a lot of mysterious scenes in the book that eventually didn’t add up (But it’s the first in the series, so I guess I’d look forward to read the other books in the series).

There was the cabin with the ladder that called out Chris’ name. We still don’t know why till date. There was the wolf. There was the cult that I still don’t know much about till now. Then, the faceless people, the gigantic man, and his dog.

So many mysteries and questions left unanswered…

One thing I loved about Solitary is the humanity of the people. The story seemed very real and real teenage problems were visualised.

I also liked how God was mentioned and spoken about in that subtle manner that gets the characters sincerely curious and at the same time gets the reader curious about what happens next.

I enjoyed the playlists, albums, and songs that were infused in the story and how just like every other person, the music spoke to Chris everytime he listened and they seemed to communicate how he felt at the time.

This book got me turning the pages hurriedly. My curiosity was piqued and yet I couldn’t predict what happened next.

Every answer I expected to get was not answered and yet the book ended so realistically.

Ofcourse, the ending wasn’t what I expected but still, it was well written and enjoyable.

It was everything I wanted the book to be and more.

I look forward to reading more books and recommendations by Travis Thrasher.

4 stars

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